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From the Archives: Doctor Feel-Not-So-Good

cranquis:

Look, I’m a parent. I know it sucks to see your child in pain. You just want to take all that pain on yourself, you want it to never have happened, you hope that it’s not a sign of something terminal or crippling or life-altering. And you bring that squawling child to the doctor…

131 notes

Essays from the Exam Room 1

ladykaymd:

You all remember my Stories from the War(ds) series I was writing about my internal medicine clerkship?? (No, go read it!) But I’ve been meaning to start a new one about my family medicine clerkship forever (in fact most of the notes for his piece were journaled about more than three weeks ago!!). I just haven’t had the chance to get to it!

BUT the wait is over!! Soooo I’d like to introduce you to the continuing series of “LadyKay writes about medicine” posts! 

Essays from the Exam Room

1

 We all talk about small-towns the same way in America: a haven for diners with blue-plate specials and a church on every street corner. We fill our writing and our conversations about small town life with well-worn clichés, as though small town life was somehow simpler, quainter than the rest of the world. We, as writers, have by some unspoken agreement, decided to populate all literature about small towns with what was best summed up by Lou Reed of the Velvet Underground: “There’s only one good thing about a small town—you know that you want to get out”.

I’ll do my best to not fall into any of the traps of talking about small-town America in this piece.

Forgive me if I fail.

The one thing I will say about small towns is they are an incredible place for stories. Have you ever noticed how many novels are set in small towns? Mark Twain, Carson McCullers, James Herriot and even some of William Faulkner (Absalom, Absalom! anyone?). Perhaps it’s the small size of the stage that makes these stories seem so large.

The drama of a small story seemingly larger without the backdrop of a million other stories.

After the strange uncharted land of internal medicine, switching to family medicine is…familiar. Family medicine is the type of medicine most of us have the greatest experience with in our own lives. For healthy people, a family med doc is your PCP, the jack-of-all-trades who did a little of all the kinds of medicine you needed. They’re the ones who did your injections for school at age 5, the ones who diagnosed you with strep throat or mono. FM practitioners are the doctors who manage your father’s hypertension or your grandmother’s diabetes. Sometimes they’re the ones who do your prenatal visit, talk you through how to quit smoking, or are the first ones to say to you “it might be depression”.

This family medicine clinic is fairly generic. We’ve all seen a hundred like it—young women in butterfly scrubs at the front desk checking in patients, the same beads on a wire toys on the floor, and a stack of magazines many months out of date in the waiting room. The clinic rooms are nondescript, with walls covered in posters on smoking cessation and vaccination schedules. Cabinets with child safety locks sit in the corners, crammed with alcohol swabs and one-use speculums. Every surface is piled with informational flyers about diabetes, arthritis, hypertension.

The people, on the other hand, are far from generic.

Read More

156 notes

Liars

Attending:
You were on call last night?
J:
Yes.
Attending:
How was it?
J:
It was alright. Steady night.
Attending:
Are you ready to start the day?
J:
Yes, let's do it.
Attending:
You see, everyone, the problem with us is that as members of the medical field, we have selected ourselves out to have certain qualities. We tend to be perfectionistic, dedicated and always aiming to please. We lie to ourselves, minimize the problems when in reality, we all need to take better care of ourselves and each other.
Everyone:
*Nods*
Attending:
You said you are ready? How many hours of sleep did you get?
J:
...None.
Attending:
We owe it to ourselves at least that much to be honest of what we can and cannot do.

1,420 notes

i am stones where used to be cities
and if you breathe too closely to me
you can still smell burning, i am
a shell constructed from
music lyrics and poems and
i don’t let people in

but you,
you are the kind
who sees
galaxies in your coffee
where others just see
sugar and cream
and you’re the one who says
“go on, i’m listening” even when
i’ve already realized how boring the story is
that i’m telling
and you’re the one who makes sure i got home
safe and that i’m eating well and getting out of bed

i mean you must be
an archaeologist
because where others saw ruin
and black nights and
spite

you looked into my eyes
and whispered
“you’re so full
of life.”

"He always said I didn’t love him. I do. I feel like I’ve been breathing in liquid poison. My head is so fuzzy, dizzy, and throbbing. My heart feels like its going to crumble apart with each beat." /// r.i.d (via inkskinned)

0 notes

Showing me kindness, treating me special—yet seems that everything is still vague.
There is something I want to know, but I don’t know if I should ask that someone.

Filed under ignoreme confused thoughts

305 notes

Anonymous asked: You only got into medschool because you're hot and teachers want to bang you before you fail out. I hope you're researching secretary positions by now it won't be long.

cranquis:

aspiringdoctors:

pleasedotheneedful:

—dopamine:

coffeemuggermd:

😂

And I hope you’re not a scientist you know, making all these claims and predictions based on no evidence.

No worries I won’t screw you up when you’re on my operating table.

😂

Best way to react to anon hate.

there’s a lot of weird anon hate infiltrating medblr, directed at women. probably the same one or two dudes imho

anyway bro your mindset is about 50 years behind the times.

Dear Greyface hating on my medblr buddy:
I’m not as nice as coffeemuggermd.

You know one of the my most vivid memories of things I did in gross anatomy lab? Dissecting the testicles.

You do that by making an incision near the top of the scrotum, fishing down with your fingers in the nutsack to clear away all the fascia suspending the testicles, and then pulling them out of the incision and letting them dangle by the spermatic cord and vessels. It looks like a hard boiled egg until you dissect the outer covering.

Think about that before you start insulting lady medical professionals, ok pal?

image

Love,

AspDocs and probably everyone else

Since the testicular-related threats have already been appropriately doled out, let me address some of the underlying stupidity in Greyface’s message:

  1. Med school teachers do not have any impact on whether you get accepted or not — there’s a special application committee which determines that.
  2. Even if you’re smoking hot, that fact doesn’t get you an interview for (much less get you ACCEPTED to) med school — it actually takes a lot of hard work, time investment, and yes intelligence in order to have all the qualifications to just get past the first round of applications.
  3. Let’s pretend that this theoretical “horny med school admissions committee” DID accept you to med school primarily because they want to “bang you” — well, they certainly wouldn’t accept you if they thought that you would fail out of med school (before OR after this theoretical big bang). Because the last thing they want is for a hole to open up in their class (LANGUAGE??!), with all the scheduling/financial chaos that causes (for the student body, not just the failed student).

(Annnnd right now somewhere in Southern California, a screenwriter is frantically scribbling “Horny Med School Admissions Committee” on a napkin…)

OH — one last thing, Greyface — here’s the definition of psychological projection. Cuz that’s what you’ve got going on… jerk.

*not wasting a gif on this loser*

2,134 notes

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.
Fact submitted by: bonjourtammy

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Fact submitted by: bonjourtammy

42 notes

cranquis:

biomedicalephemera:

I do not make money on this blog. The very little I make on donations generally goes to the few physical resources I have for this blog (or whatever else I have elsewise disclosed - such as the Madison theater fund in my brother’s name or my cat’s surgery), or towards replacing my external hard-drives to keep my digital resources.
My blog is CC BY-NC 4.0. 
Previously, I had it listed as CC BY 3.0, but since the advent of Creative Commons 4.0, I am now CC BY-NC. This means that you can copy, redistribute, remix, or share the content in any format, but credit must be given, and commercial use is restricted. 
Increasingly, I’ve been spending much, much more time with the writing and research than I have been spending on the graphical resources. The graphics are still okay to use in any context, you’re just kinda scummy if you imply that you made it yourself. But please do not repeat the posts wholesale as your own, or use the posts for commercial use.

To the same guy/bot/whatever that sent me the same message — please refer to above.

cranquis:

biomedicalephemera:

I do not make money on this blog. The very little I make on donations generally goes to the few physical resources I have for this blog (or whatever else I have elsewise disclosed - such as the Madison theater fund in my brother’s name or my cat’s surgery), or towards replacing my external hard-drives to keep my digital resources.

My blog is CC BY-NC 4.0.

Previously, I had it listed as CC BY 3.0, but since the advent of Creative Commons 4.0, I am now CC BY-NC. This means that you can copy, redistribute, remix, or share the content in any format, but credit must be given, and commercial use is restricted. 

Increasingly, I’ve been spending much, much more time with the writing and research than I have been spending on the graphical resources. The graphics are still okay to use in any context, you’re just kinda scummy if you imply that you made it yourself. But please do not repeat the posts wholesale as your own, or use the posts for commercial use.

To the same guy/bot/whatever that sent me the same message — please refer to above.

1,230 notes

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.
Fact submitted by: bonjourtammy

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Fact submitted by: bonjourtammy