Randomly random

All is beautiful and random

364,573 notes

mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.
There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.
It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.

There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.

It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

(Source: vastderp-placeholder, via thebrunettewhowaited)

17,677 notes

unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Autoimmune Disease Acts Like Demonic Possession
Susannah Cahalan started feeling a bit off. Numbness on one side of the body, losing sleep, crying hysterically one minute and laughing the next. She went to get MRIs but they showed nothing. Things were getting a bit more strange.
Her boyfriend told her how at one point while they were watching a show together she started grinding her teeth, moaning, and biting her tongue until she finally passed out. He took her to the hospital and they found out it was a seizure. Her first of many. Things got worse.
She stopped eating, became paranoid and delusional, had more seizures in which blood would spurt out of her mouth. She was hospitalized (one nurse recalls that in the middle of the night while she was getting blood, Susannah sat up straigh and slapped her). Numerous tests were done and the doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong.
That is until Dr. Souhel Najjar came into the picture. He asked her to draw a clock. When she showed him what she had drawn he knew exactly what was wrong with her. All the numbers were written on the right side of the clock face, and no numbers were on the left side.
She had anti-NMDAR encephalitis. The receptors in the frontal lobe, responsible for cognitive reasoning, and the limbic system, or the emotional center of the brain, are under assault by the immune system. In other words, her body was attacking her brain. Nearly 90% of people that suffer from this go undiagnosed and it is more common in women.
SOURCE
SOURCE

Oh, and she wrote a book about it called 
Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Autoimmune Disease Acts Like Demonic Possession

Susannah Cahalan started feeling a bit off. Numbness on one side of the body, losing sleep, crying hysterically one minute and laughing the next. She went to get MRIs but they showed nothing. Things were getting a bit more strange.

Her boyfriend told her how at one point while they were watching a show together she started grinding her teeth, moaning, and biting her tongue until she finally passed out. He took her to the hospital and they found out it was a seizure. Her first of many. Things got worse.

She stopped eating, became paranoid and delusional, had more seizures in which blood would spurt out of her mouth. She was hospitalized (one nurse recalls that in the middle of the night while she was getting blood, Susannah sat up straigh and slapped her). Numerous tests were done and the doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong.

That is until Dr. Souhel Najjar came into the picture. He asked her to draw a clock. When she showed him what she had drawn he knew exactly what was wrong with her. All the numbers were written on the right side of the clock face, and no numbers were on the left side.

She had anti-NMDAR encephalitis. The receptors in the frontal lobe, responsible for cognitive reasoning, and the limbic system, or the emotional center of the brain, are under assault by the immune system. In other words, her body was attacking her brain. Nearly 90% of people that suffer from this go undiagnosed and it is more common in women.

SOURCE

SOURCE

Oh, and she wrote a book about it called 

Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

(via neuromorphogenesis)

225 notes

Anonymous asked: Hi, I work at an answering service and we page a lot of doctors after hours. Sometimes other doctor or facilities will call and ask who the fellow or internist on call are. What's a fellow? What's an internist? I think there are a few more types of people they ask for, but none come to mind right now.

cranquis:

md-admissions:

Ah yes, you speak of the DOCTOR HIERARCHY! And all the names we call each other. 

What’s a fellow? And the names of our roles: I made a little a flowchart because I got a new app and I love flowcharts!

Okay, so you’re a resident now, you’ve got the MD. Aside from resident, what do I call you?

Internist: physician who specializes in internal medicine

Surgeon: I think we all know what a surgeon does

Pediatrician: physician who specializes in kids

Obstetrician, Gynecologist, OB, GYN, OB/GYN: physician who specializes in deliveries or women’s reproductive health

Family Physician, Family Doctor: Often the one people refer to as “my doctor”, because this is the physician most people will see first when they need to see a doctor and make an appointment

Psychiatrist: who is NOT a psychologist. A psychologist cannot prescribe medications. And not all psychiatrists are experts in the various therapy modalities. 

Hospitalist: This doctor primarily sees patients who are staying in the hospital. Can be a pediatrician, internist, or family physician.

Insert-latin-or-greek-name-of-organ-ologist: ex. cardiologist, hepatologist, gastroenterologist. 

Insert-same-latin-or-greek-name-surgeon: ex. cardiothoracic surgeon, hepatobiliary surgeon, orthopedic surgeon

There are obvious MANY more, but these are very common.

This is a very useful reference guide!

And don’t forget the Boss of the Boss Docs position — Section Chiefs, Head Surgeons, Attending Emeritus, “Specialist who has been around the longest and might not have an official higher ranking over the other attendings, but is acknowledged to be the Head Honcho of their department.”

16 notes

morebaffledlessbrooklyn asked: What ever happened work that donut consumption fellowship we applied for? I left the paperwork for the ACGME in the education office months ago!

princeton-medbloro:

The fellowship application is still in limbo with the ACGME, unfortunately. Since it would be the very first fellowship of its kind, there are many hoops to jump through before PMTH gets full accreditation. I have been fielding many calls from representatives at the ACGME about this fellowship, such as:

  • will we have DO staff available to teach donut consumption, and will we have set-aside spots for DO applicants? (duh, of course we will)
  • will donut consumption education be limited to certain schools of donut theory, such as Krispy or Dunkin, or will our education cover all possible realms of donut thought? (this will of course be left to  individual attendings’ discretion)
  • will cronut or beignet electives be offered? (possibly) 
  • what work hour restrictions will we follow? (education times will revolve around Hot Now sign availability, of course)
  • what about bagels? (what about them?)

Well, you get the drift, Dr. Baffled. I thank you for your dedication to the educational opportunities here at PMTH and would like to suggest that further inquiries from the ACGME be directed to your office. With your donut devotion and expertise, we could be open for applications by January!

-WayfaringMD, Dean of PMTH

Can PTs specialize in therapeutic donut treatment too? :D

16 notes

morebaffledlessbrooklyn asked: What ever happened work that donut consumption fellowship we applied for? I left the paperwork for the ACGME in the education office months ago!

princeton-medbloro:

The fellowship application is still in limbo with the ACGME, unfortunately. Since it would be the very first fellowship of its kind, there are many hoops to jump through before PMTH gets full accreditation. I have been fielding many calls from representatives at the ACGME about this fellowship, such as:

  • will we have DO staff available to teach donut consumption, and will we have set-aside spots for DO applicants? (duh, of course we will)
  • will donut consumption education be limited to certain schools of donut theory, such as Krispy or Dunkin, or will our education cover all possible realms of donut thought? (this will of course be left to  individual attendings’ discretion)
  • will cronut or beignet electives be offered? (possibly) 
  • what work hour restrictions will we follow? (education times will revolve around Hot Now sign availability, of course)
  • what about bagels? (what about them?)

Well, you get the drift, Dr. Baffled. I thank you for your dedication to the educational opportunities here at PMTH and would like to suggest that further inquiries from the ACGME be directed to your office. With your donut devotion and expertise, we could be open for applications by January!

-WayfaringMD, Dean of PMTH